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Prior to the creation of the Inter-Tribal Council of Louisiana, there was little known about the tribal communities in the state, and their rich culture and history. Prior to the creation of the Inter-Tribal Council of Louisiana, there was little known about the tribal communities in the state, and their rich culture and history.

Many of the Louisiana tribes exchanged trade and commerce amongst themselves, and with early European settlers. The Indian people of Louisiana played a vital role in developing settlements in the Territory.

In 1972, the Louisiana tribal communities realized that they needed to form an organization to work in the best interests of tribal members in the state and ensure that each community have formally educated people, quality healthcare, and basic infrastructural needs, like housing and roads.
Mr. Ernest Sickey, then Chairman of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana and Louisiana’s Director of the Office of Indian Affairs, launched plans to create a state Inter-Tribal Council to do just that.

Mr. Sickey, along with Mr. Larry Burgess of Chitimacha, Mr. Clyde Jackson of Jena Band of Choctaw, and Mr. Howard Dion of United Houma Nation, created an inter-tribal coalition that would allow even Indian groups that lacked federal recognition access to some of the resources that come with federal acknowledgement. And so, ITCLA was born.